Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Combination Loan Mean

1. A transaction consisting of two separate loans for the same borrower by the same lender. The initial loan is used to finance the construction of a new home; upon completion of construction, the loan is repaid by a second loan, which is a permanent mortgage on the home. The initial construction loan is usually an adjustable-rate mortgage, while the subsequent mortgage might be any one of the mortgage types available.
2. The simultaneous use of a first and second mortgage to finance a home. The first loan is usually made for 80% of the home's value and has a first lien position, while the second loan is usually for 10-20% of the home's value and has a second lien position. This transaction is frequently used to avoid having to pay private mortgage insurance. This type of combination loan is also known as a "piggy-back" or "80-10-10 transaction".

Car Title Loan

A short-term loan in which the borrower's car title is used as collateral. The borrower must be the lien holder (i.e. own the car outright). Loans are usually for less than 30 days. If the loan is not repaid, the lender can take ownership of the car and sell it to recoup the loan amount. These loans are also known as "auto title loans" or just "title loans". Car title loan lenders often target those with low incomes and bad credit and charge high interest rates; those with access to credit cards or bank loans would not be the target customers. Car title or auto title lenders are sometimes called "predatory lenders" because of the way in which they prey on those who need cash in emergency situations.Although lenders must state the interest rate at the time the loan is made, if it is a short-term loan, the borrower may not realize that the quoted rate is not annualized. For example, if a one-month loan rate is advertised at 25%, that annualized rate is actually 300%.

Term Loan

A loan from a bank for a specific amount that has a specified repayment schedule and a floating interest rate. Term loans almost always mature between one and 10 years.For example many banks have term-loan programs that can offer small businesses the cash they need to operate from month to month. Often a small business will use the cash from a term loan to purchase fixed assets such as equipment used in its production process.

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Forex

The market in which currencies are traded. The forex market is the largest, most liquid market in the world with an average traded value that exceeds $1.9 trillion per day and includes all of the currencies in the world.There is no central marketplace for currency exchange; trade is conducted over the counter. The forex market is open 24 hours a day, five days a week, and currencies are traded worldwide among the major financial centers of London, New York, Tokyo, Z├╝rich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris and Sydney.The forex is the largest market in the world in terms of the total cash value traded, and any person, firm or country may participate in this market.

Forex Market

The market in which participants are able to buy, sell, exchange and speculate on currencies. The forex markets is made up of banks, commercial companies, central banks, investment management firms, hedge funds, and retail forex brokers and investors. The currency market is considered to be the largest financial market in the world, processing trillions of dollars worth of transactions each day.The foreign exchange markets isn't dominated by a single market exchange, but involves a global network of computers and brokers from around the world. Central banks use their massive buying and selling capabilities to alter exchange rates through their open market activities and in many cases will do so not with profit in mind, but rather for any number of policy reasons. Forex brokers act as market makers as well, and may post bid and ask prices for a currency pair that differs from the most competitive bid in the market.

Forex Trading Strategy

A set of analyses that a forex day trader uses to determine whether to buy or sell a currency pair at any given time. Forex trading strategies can be based on technical analysis charting tools or fundamental, news-based events. The day trader's currency trading strategy is usually made up of a multitude of signals, which trigger buy or sell decisions. Forex trading strategies are available for free, for a fee or are developed by the traders themselves.Forex trading strategies can be either manual or automated. A manual system involves a trader sitting at the computer screen, looking for signals and interpreting whether to buy or sell. An automated trading system involves the trader "teaching" the software what signals to look for and how to interpret them. It is thought that automated trading takes out the human element of psychology that is detrimental to a lot of traders.Both automated and manual day trading strategies are available for purchase over the internet. It is important to note that there is no such thing as the "holy grail" of trading systems. If the system was a perfect money maker, the seller would not want to share it.

Tuesday, March 3, 2009

VA Loan

A mortgage loan program established by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs to help veterans and their families obtain home financing. The Department of Veterans Affairs does not directly originate VA loans; instead, they establish the rules for those who may qualify, dictate the terms of the mortgages offered and insure VA loans against default.VA loans offer up to 100% financing on the value of a home. To qualify for a VA loan, borrowers must present a certificate of eligibility, which establishes their record of military service, to the lender. VA loans, FHA loans and other loans insured by departments of the United States government are securitized by the Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae). These securities carry the guarantee against default of the Untied States government.

Evergreen Loan

A loan that does not require the principal amount to be paid off within a specified period of time. Evergreen loans are usually in the form of a short-term line of credit that is routinely renewed leaving the principal remaining outstanding for the long term. Also called a "standing" or "revolving loan".Credit cards and checking account overdraft lines of credit are widely-used as evergreen or revolving loans. Evergreen loans are a useful type of personal credit because the user does not need to reapply for a new loan every time they need to use it.

Car Title Loan

A short-term loan in which the borrower's car title is used as collateral. The borrower must be the lien holder (i.e. own the car outright). Loans are usually for less than 30 days. If the loan is not repaid, the lender can take ownership of the car and sell it to recoup the loan amount. These loans are also known as "auto title loans" or just "title loans". Car title loan lenders often target those with low incomes and bad credit and charge high interest rates; those with access to credit cards or bank loans would not be the target customers. Car title or auto title lenders are sometimes called "predatory lenders" because of the way in which they prey on those who need cash in emergency situations.Although lenders must state the interest rate at the time the loan is made, if it is a short-term loan, the borrower may not realize that the quoted rate is not annualized. For example, if a one-month loan rate is advertised at 25%, that annualized rate is actually 300%.

Saturday, February 28, 2009

Fixed-Rule Policy

A fiscal or monetary policy designed to be an economic goal or target of a government. A fixed-rule policy, by definition, is pursued no matter the condition of the economy, and is considered independent of the current economic state.For example, a fixed-rule policy of any government could be that the maximum target level of inflation must be less then 5% for any given year, as measured by the consumer price index (CPI). By creating a fixed-rule policy, a government can focus on longer term goals for an economy, and provide economic direction.

Term Life Insurance

A policy with a set duration limit on the coverage period. Once the policy is expired, it is up to the policy owner to decide whether to renew the term life insurance policy or to let the coverage end. This type of insurance policy contrasts with permanent life insurance, in which duration extends until the policy owner reaches 100 years of age.These types of policies provide a stated benefit upon the death of the policy owner, provided that the death occurs within a specific time period. However, the policy does not provide any returns beyond the stated benefit, unlike permanent life insurance policies, which have a savings component that can be used for wealth accumulation.

Named Perils Insurance Policy

A home insurance policy that only provides coverage on losses incurred to your property from hazards or events named on the policy. Named peril policies may be purchased as a less expensive alternative to a comprehensive coverage or broad policies, which are policies that tend to offer coverage to most perils.
Suppose a homeowner doesn't live in an earthquake and flooding prone area, but is still concerned about fire, theft and hail damage. The homeowner may elect to get a named perils policy and only declare coverage against fire, theft and hail, while leaving the earthquake and flooding coverage off the policy.

Keep in mind that a broad coverage policy does not necessarily guarantee your property will be covered against all forms of perils. These policies contain conditions that cover what the insurer thinks are the most likely perils. Therefore it's a good idea for homeowners to check their broad coverage policies to make sure they do cover all the perils that they are concerned about. If the broad policy isn't sufficient, homeowners should buy a named peril policy to fill that hole in their coverage.

Monday, February 23, 2009

Hazard Insurance

Insurance that protects a property owner against damage caused by fires, severe storms, earthquakes or other natural events. As long as the specific event is covered within the policy, the property owner will receive compensation to cover the cost of any damage incurred. Typically, the property owner will be required to pay for a year's worth of premiums at the time of closing, but this will depend on the exact details of the policy.
A typical property or homeowners' insurance policy usually won't cover all events that could do damage to your property. Some events will definitely be excluded from homeowners' insurance in high-risk areas. For example, Florida is prone to hurricanes and is, therefore, considered high risk. If the homeowner lives in a high-risk area, he or she may need a separate policy - such as a flood insurance policy.

High-Deductible Health Plan - HDHP

A health insurance plan that has a high minimum deductible, which does not cover the initial costs or all of the costs of medical expenses. The deductible forces the insurance holder to pay the first portion of a medical expense before the insurance coverage kicks in. The minimum deductible for a plan to fall into the category of an HDHP varies each year. In 2006, it was more than $1,000 for individuals and $2,000 for families.
These health plans became more common when the new health savings account (HSA) legislation was signed into law in 2003. In order to open an HSA account, an individual must first have an HDHP. These high-deductible health plans are thought to lower overall healthcare costs by forcing individuals to be more conscious of medical expenses. The higher deductible also lowers insurance premiums, making health coverage more affordable.

Casualty Insurance

A broad category of coverage against loss of property, damage or other liabilities. Casualty insurance includes vehicle insurance, liability insurance, theft insurance and elevator insurance.
An important type of casualty insurance for businesses is workers' compensation insurance, which protects a company from liabilities that arise when a worker is injured on the job. For homeowners or car owners, it's important to have casualty insurance as damage can end up being a large expense.

Universal Life Insurance

A type of flexible permanent life insurance offering the low-cost protection of term life insurance as well as a savings element (like whole life insurance) which is invested to provide a cash value buildup. The death benefit, savings element and premiums can be reviewed and altered as a policyholder's circumstances change. In addition, unlike whole life insurance, universal life insurance allows the policyholder to use the interest from his or her accumulated savings to help pay premiums.
Universal life insurance was created to provide more flexibility than whole life insurance by allowing the policy owner to shift money between the insurance and savings components of the policy. Premiums, which are variable, are broken down by the insurance company into insurance and savings, allowing the policy owner to make adjustments based on their individual circumstances. For example, if the savings portion is earning a low return, it can be used instead of external funds to pay the premiums. Unlike whole life insurance, universal life allows the cash value of investments to grow at a variable rate that is adjusted monthly.

Homeowners Insurance

A form of property insurance designed to protect an individual's home against damages to the house itself, or to possessions in the home. Homeowners insurance also provides liability coverage against accidents in the home or on the property.

In the U.S. there are seven forms of homeowners insurance that have become standardized in the industry; they range in name from HO-1 through HO-8 and offer various levels of protection depending on the needs of the homeowner.
While homeowners insurance covers most scenarios where loss could occur, some events are typically excluded from policies, namely: earthquakes, floods or other "acts of God" and acts of war.

For people who live in certain parts of the country, adding an extra policy for earthquake insurance or flood insurance can be a good idea to offer further home protection and peace of mind. Some homeowners insurance is designed for renters, typically HO-4 or "renters insurance", and only covers possessions within the home and isolated events not covered in the property insurance held by the owner.

Thursday, January 29, 2009

Key Person Insurance

A life insurance policy that a company purchases on a key executive's life. The company is the beneficiary of the plan and pays the insurance policy premiums.
Also known as "key man insurance", "key woman insurance" or "business life insurance.Key person insurance is needed if the sudden loss of a key executive would have a large negative effect on the company's operations. The payout provided from the death of the executive essentially buys the company time to find a new person or to implement other strategies to save the business.

Variable Life Insurance Policy

A form of whole life insurance, variable life insurance provides permanent protection to the beneficiary upon the death of the policy holder. This type of insurance is generally the most expensive type of cash-value insurance because it allows you to allocate a portion of your premium dollars to a separate account comprised of various instruments and investment funds within the insurance company's portfolio such stocks, bonds, equity funds, money market funds and bond funds. In addition, because of investment risks, variable policies are considered securities contracts and are regulated under the federal securities laws; therefore, they must be sold with a prospectus.The major advantage to variable policies is that they allow you to participate in various types of investment options while not being taxed on your earnings (until you surrender the policy). You can also apply the interest earned on these investments toward the premiums, potentially lowering the amount you pay. However, due to investment risks, when the invested funds perform poorly, less money is available to pay the premiums, meaning that you may have to pay more than you can afford to keep the policy in force. Poor fund performance also means that the cash and/or death benefit may decline, though never below a defined level. Also, you cannot withdraw from the cash value during your lifetime.

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Level-Premium Insurance

A type of term life insurance for which the premiums remain the same throughout the duration of the contract. The premium paid on this type of policy will be higher at the beginning of its life but lower towards the end of its life as compared to term policies that have rising premium rates.This policy is a type of term life insurance, meaning it provides coverage only for a specified duration and it has only a death benefit, no savings component. Therefore, when looking at level-premium insurance, you should carefully consider the length of coverage best suited to your needs. For example, if the primary purpose of the death benefit is to provide income to support very young children and/or fund college expenses, a 20-year level premium might be appropriate. However, if these children are already in their early teens, you may need only a 10-year level premium.

If you enter into this type of insurance policy, it is important to ensure that the premium level is guaranteed. In some cases, a policy's premium level is not guaranteed, and the company can actually raise it to a new premium level which will have to be paid for the remainder of the policy's life.

Permanent Life Insurance

An umbrella term for life insurance plans that do not expire (unlike term life insurance) and combine a death benefit with a savings portion. This savings portion can build a cash value - against which the policy owner can borrow funds, or in some instances, the owner can withdraw the cash value to help meet future goals, such as paying for a child's college education. The two main types of permanent life insurance are whole and universal life insurance policies. To borrow against the savings portion of a permanent life insurance policy, there is usually a waiting period after the purchase of your policy for sufficient cash value to accumulate. Also, if the amount of the unpaid interest on your loan plus your outstanding loan balance exceeds the amount of your policy's cash value, your policy and all coverage will terminate.

Permanent life insurance policies enjoy favorable tax treatment. The growth of cash value is generally on a tax-deferred basis, meaning that you pay no taxes on any earnings in the policy so long as the policy remains active. Provided you adhere to certain premium limits, money can be taken out of the policy without being subject to taxes since policy loans generally are not considered taxable income. Generally, withdrawals up to the amount of premiums paid can be taken without being taxed.

Whole Life Insurance Policy

A life insurance contract with level premiums that has both an insurance and an investment component. The insurance component pays a stated amount upon death of the insured. The investment component accumulates a cash value that the policyholder can withdraw or borrow against. As the most basic form of cash-value life insurance, whole life insurance is a way to accumulate wealth as regular premiums pay insurance costs and contribute to equity growth in a savings account where dividends or interest is allowed to build-up tax-deferred.

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

Health Insurance

A type of insurance coverage that pays for medical and surgical expenses that are incurred by the insured. Health insurance can either reimburse the insured for expenses incurred from illness or injury or pay the care provider directly. Health insurance is often included in employer benefit packages as a means of enticing quality employees.The cost of health insurance premiums is deductible to the payer, and benefits received are tax-free. Health insurance has many cousins, such as disability insurance, critical illness insurance and long-term care (LTC) insurance.

Insurance Claim

A formal request to an insurance company asking for a payment based on the terms of the insurance policy. Insurance claims are reviewed by the company for their validity and then paid out to the insured or requesting party (on behalf of the insured) once approved.Insurance claims cover everything from death benefits on life insurance policies to routine health exams at your local doctor. In many cases, claims are filed by third parties on behalf of the insured person, but usually only the person(s) listed on the policy is entitled to claims payment.

Insurance

A contract (policy) in which an individual or entity receives financial protection or reimbursement against losses from an insurance company. The company pools clients' risks to make payments more affordable for the insured.When shopping around for an insurance policy, look for the best priced package that is right for you - prices can vary from one insurance company to the next. And make sure you know what you want.Some individuals, for example, prefer 24-hour claims service or face-to-face contact with an insurance representative. Also consider the claims settlement process, the amount of the deductible and the extent of the replacement coverage. Insurance companies and the policies they offer are not all the same, so think about more than just the price.

Thursday, January 8, 2009

Insurance2

A contract (policy) in which an individual or entity receives financial protection or reimbursement against losses from an insurance company. The company pools clients' risks to make payments more affordable for the insured.
when shopping around for an insurance policy, look for the best priced package that is right for you.they pay may vary from 1 lakh to 1 crore.if a insurance company is paying high means,then the monthly investment for a person will also increase.the insurance can be made for any property like home,vehicles,stores and even on human beings.One cannot easily apply for insurance since there are various procedure to follow.the most important is first they will check whether the person is alive and he is capable of paying.

Monday, January 5, 2009

Minimum wages

Minimum wages is the lowest hourly, daily, or monthly wage that employers may legally pay to employees or workers. Equivalently, it is the lowest wage at which workers may sell their labor. Although minimum wage laws are in effect in a great many jurisdictions, there are differences of opinion about the benefits and drawbacks of a minimum wage. Supporters of the minimum wage say that it prevents the exploitation of workers.Minimum wages have drawn strong criticism from many economists, since it establishes a price floor on wages. Price floors can lead to a dead weight loss in the economy, which means that inefficiencies exist. In this case, the minimum wage might force companies to hire fewer employees, thus increasing unemployment.

financial crisis

When a bank suffers a sudden rush of withdrawals by depositors, this is called a bank run. Since banks lend out most of the cash they receive in deposits (see fractional-reserve banking), it is difficult for them to quickly pay back all deposits if these are suddenly demanded, so a run may leave the bank in bankruptcy, causing many depositors to lose their savings unless they are covered by deposit insurance. A situation in which bank runs are widespread is called a systemic banking crisis or just a banking panic. A situation without widespread bank runs, but in which banks are reluctant to lend, because they worry that they have insufficient funds available, is often called a credit crunch.

When a country that maintains a fixed exchange rate is suddenly forced to devalue its currency because of a speculative attack, this is called a currency crisis or balance of payments crisis. When a country fails to pay back its sovereign debt, this is called a sovereign default. While devaluation and default could both be voluntary decisions of the government, they are often perceived to be the involuntary results of a change in investor sentiment that leads to a sudden stop in capital inflows or a sudden increase in capital flight.

Global insurance

Global insurance premiums grew by 8.0% in 2006 (or 5% in real terms) to reach $3.7 trillion due to improved profitability and a benign economic environment characterised by solid economic growth, moderate inflation and strong equity markets. Profitability improved in both life and non-life insurance in 2006 compared to the previous year. Life insurance premiums grew by 10.2% in 2006 as demand for annuity and pension products rose. Non-life insurance premiums grew by 5.0% due to growth in premium rates. Over the past decade, global insurance premiums rose by more than a half as annual growth fluctuated between 2% and 11%.

Insurance

Captive insurance companies may be defined as limited-purpose insurance companies established with the specific objective of financing risks emanating from their parent group or groups. This definition can sometimes be extended to include some of the risks of the parent company's customers. In short, it is an in-house self-insurance vehicle. Captives may take the form of a "pure" entity (which is a 100% subsidiary of the self-insured parent company); of a "mutual" captive (which insures the collective risks of members of an industry); and of an "association" captive (which self-insures individual risks of the members of a professional, commercial or industrial association). Captives represent commercial, economic and tax advantages to their sponsors because of the reductions in costs they help create and for the ease of insurance risk management and the flexibility for cash flows they generate. Additionally, they may provide coverage of risks which is neither available nor offered in the traditional insurance market at reasonable prices.